James Lee Byars, Untitled (Performable Scroll), c. 1967. Courtesy Michael Werner Gallery, New York & London via MomaPs1.org

James Lee Byars, Untitled (Performable Scroll), c. 1967. Courtesy Michael Werner Gallery, New York & London via MomaPs1.org

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a kind of timidity bordering on fear when I was called upon to leave
‘the world of will and idea’ in which I had lived and worked
and in the reality of which I had believed. But the blissful
feeling of liberating non-objectivity drew me into the ‘desert’
where nothing is real but feeling and feeling became the content
of my life. This was no ‘empty square’ which I had exhibited
but rather the sensation of non-objectivity.

Hilbersheimer: Kasimir Malevich and the Non-Objective World (Art Journal, 12/1960, Volume 20, Issue 2)

[Black Square]

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Ramos-Poquí, Guillem  (1995) “Interdisciplinary Model in Fine Art Education/Research”

Ramos-Poquí, Guillem (1995) “Interdisciplinary Model in Fine Art Education/Research”

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Screenshot 2014-07-02 at 22.48

Screenshot 2014-07-02 at 22.48

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According to convention, I am not simply what I am doing now. I am also what I have done, and my conventionally edited version of my past is made to seem almost more the real ‘me’ than what I am at this moment. For what I am seems so fleeting and intangible, but what I was is fixed and final. It is the firm basis for predictions of what I will be in the future, and so it comes about that I am more closely identified with what no longer exists than what actually is!
Watts, Alan (1957) The Way of Zen
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In the perception of the incomprehensible peculiarity of something which is sensually given, we gain a view of our lives in the present that is otherwise not at our disposal. The attention to what is appearing is thus at the same time attention we pay to ourselves.
Seel, Martin (2003), Ästhetik des Erscheines, pg 9. in Peter Lodermeyer (2007) - Personal Structures; Time, Space, Existence (pg 27)
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Screenshot 2014-05-27 at 11.30

Screenshot 2014-05-27 at 11.30

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In the everyday use of language, words are the vehicles of ideas. The word ‘flower’ means flower that refers to flowers in the world. No doubt it is possible to read literature in this way, but literature is more than this everyday use of language. For in literature ‘flower’ does not just mean flower but many things and it can only do so because the word is independent from what it signifies. This independence, which is passed over in the everyday use of language, is the negativity at the heart of language. The word means something because it negates the physical reality of the thing. Only in this way can the idea arise. The absence of the thing is made good by the presence of the idea. What the everyday use of language steps over to make use of the idea, literature remains fascinated by, the absence that makes it possible. Literary language, therefore, is a double negation, both of the thing and the idea. It is in this space that literature becomes possible where words take on a strange and mysterious reality of their own, and where also meaning and reference remain allusive and ambiguous.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurice_Blanchot
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I think I can positively state that she said only one thing, but that one thing was strangely bold. In the midst of the silence she asked me, “Do you know other women?” “Yes of course”. A fairly clear meaning can be ascribed to this question. That meaning, I am sure, would be ridiculously misleading, or at least so straightforward, so simple that it would represent nothing of the truth which was touched upon there; and even my answer, in its spontaneity, meant something that had nothing to do with life and the course of the world. I have never been frank. I have never thought that just because you happen to meet many people you are obliged to surrender them to the curiosity or the jealousy of other people: they appear and disappear in an obscurity which they merit. My frankness was therefore a new right, a warning given in the name of a truth which did not require any ordinary proofs and which emerged from hidden things to assert itself proudly in my mouth.
Blanchot, Maurice (1948) “L’arrêt de mort” (death sentence), p50-51
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Pessoa, Fernando (Trans. Richard Zenith, 1998) “The Book of Disquiet”

Pessoa, Fernando (Trans. Richard Zenith, 1998) “The Book of Disquiet”

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